Supporting Assessment Autonomy: How One Small School Articulated the Infrastructure Needed to Own and Use Student Data

Journal article

Read sbout one teacher-powered school’s effort to create a K-12 system of student assessment data to capture teachers' collective vision of what students should know and be able to do.

Turning the tables to own and use student assessment data--rather than react and respond to these data--is an enormous challenge in our accountability-driven policy culture. Yet, with increasing support for new small school design and innovation—fueled by teachers’ professional autonomy—there is an opportunity to think differently about student data and the potential to capture student learning using measures that reflect the particular aims of new school designs.

If schooling is no longer a one-size-fits-all enterprise, then the data we collect in schools must follow suit. Supporting assessment autonomy: How one small school articulated the infrastructure needed to own and use student data (by Karen Hunter Quartz, Jarod Kawasaki, Daniel Sotelo, and Kimberly Merino) reports the results of 18 months of integrated problem-solving research on one teacher-powered school’s effort to create a K-12 system of student assessment data to capture the school’s vision of what students should know and be able to do.